Conversion Rate Optimization, E-Commerce

30 Psychological CRO Tests to Run on Your E-Commerce Site ft. @ObjeqtEcomm

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

Conversion rate optimization is all about psychology. But where psychologists are trying to figure out why people do what they do, the Conversion Rate Optimizer’s challenge is to know what stimuli will get people to take the action you want them to take. In this post we list 30 psychological CRO tests to run on your e-commerce site.

It’s not about being manipulative. That’s the dark side.

Noooo! I won’t! Even though that cookie is a really good incentive that preys upon my desire for immediate gratification (we’ll get to that later).

On the side of good: This is about showing people what they want and giving them every reason and every chance to get it. You might say it’s about helping people to achieve their goals – as much as it is about achieving yours.

The CRO also has tools and tests to know, beyond a Rorschach ink blot of a doubt, whether the psychological trigger s/he’s employed works… or doesn’t.

This is where we bring psychology and testing together, so you can try these already-proven, scientifically based psychological action triggers and see how they work on your very own e-commerce website.

For each trigger, we’ll include ideas for how to use it on your website – in your product pages, landing pages, or CTA buttons. From there, it’s up to you to A/B test these suggestions against what you currently have.

Read More on Objeqt


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

Customer Success, Metrics

Why Customer Success Metrics are Critical to Every Department ft. @UseNotion

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

Customer Success is, when done right, pro-active. Customer success managers are constantly on the lookout (often with the help of auto-notifications set to deploy when customers show signs of trouble) for what customers need now, and what customers need next. But the quantitative and qualitative data Customer Success Managers use to feel the pulse of the customer base isn’t just useful for their department. It’s useful for every department. Critical even.

How can customer success help colleagues in other departments?

Data Driven + Customer Centric Product Management

Customer Success data typically includes real-time visibility into customers’ health (calculated with a combo of usage data and contextual data). So CSMs know what customers are using most, and are the first to know when a feature is leading to confusion and frustration. That information alone can direct the priorities of Product Managers when they’re creating their product roadmaps, but perhaps the most useful piece of information is this: Customer Success also knows what customers will need next.

For example, if Customer Success sees that customers are doing really well with the product, but could use an expansion or new feature to reach the next level, that information is crucial to data driven product teams (and to the growth of the company). Customer Success teams can implement a system of tagging that allows them to mark similar needs and wants in each customer record. If you’ve got the right metrics tracking tools in place, your team can then regularly deliver this data to product, telling them how many customers are requesting or needing new features and how those needs have changed over time.

For example, if you’re using Intercom for customer engagement, you can create segments based on users that have been tagged by requesting a certain feature. You could deliver that raw data to product, or you can use a tool like Notion that tracks trends in those requests over time, giving product a deeper understanding of the urgency of the need and the ability to do further research into which types of customers are making those requests. The end result is a product team with a richer and more nuanced understanding of the needs of their customers and the ability to craft a more customer centric product roadmap in the long term. Learn more about that communication strategy with Notion’s recent post: How Customer Success Can Deliver Data Driven Customer Insight.

Read More on Notion


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

Conversion Rate Optimization, E-Commerce, Emotion

Colors & Conversions in E-Commerce Design ft. @ObjeqtEcomm

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

The psychology of color is a subject of strong disagreement in marketing. We know we need it, and we’d like there to be a list of rules to follow that remain the same in all instances – but there isn’t. Color preference, associations, and color cause and effect, vary widely between individuals and cultures.

So, what we’re left with is what we’ve always been left with

We have to design based on close research of our target audience – and that goes for colors too.

That’s not to say that there aren’t valuable guidelines for color selection that are grounded in science – there are (and they’re outlined below).

Here is what we know, what we think, and what has been proven to work when it comes to color and conversion in e-commerce design.

Read More on Objeqt


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

Customer Support

Customer Service Psychology 101 – 6 Powerful Principles

In a perfect world, everyone in a customer-facing position would take Psychology 101 – because, as every customer service professional knows, people are complicated.

Some are moody, some are grumpy, some are mad, some are absolutely lovely and brighten your day. And whatever emotional cornucopia these patrons come in with, you can bet that something completely outside of your control is the cause. Once they’re on the phone (or in the chat box) though, your goal is to turn every frown upside-down to create delightful experiences, no matter how the conversation began.

Did I say take a class in Psychology? You might need a doctorate!

Kidding.

There’s a secret to making this happen.

If you can understand the underlying essential needs of your customers, you can deliver outstanding experiences almost every time.

But first, you have to understand where your customers are coming from.

Read More on UserLike


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

Photo Friday

Photo Friday: 3/24/17

Taking Instagram photos is my hobby. In this series, I post a few photos on Friday that I recently took.




Follow me on Instagram for more of my work.

Data Science, Startups

Engagement: The Key to a Data Driven Culture ft. @UseNotion

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

A “Data-driven culture” is what so many businesses aspire to be. They think that if they have the data, organize the data, and use the data to make decisions, that they will automatically infuse it into the very fibers of their corporate culture.

If only it were that easy.

Yes, obtaining data and organizing it may be the first necessary steps towards creating a “data driven culture,” but unless you can get your team excited about using that data – it’s close to worthless.

Having a data-driven culture means that everyone – not just analysts, product managers and marketers – understands the data you’re collecting, can find the data you’ve collected, and knows how to use that data to improve and optimize their work. And, of course, it’s not about your team just knowing how to use the data, but feeling empowered, encouraged, and even excited to make data an integral part of their work.

For that to happen, employees need reasons why adding data to their lives will make their work easier and get them better results.

But, engendering enthusiasm can be an uphill battle, especially if your mountains of numbers tend to scare people away.

Read More on Notion


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

Conversion Rate Optimization

Pricing CRO Style: Matching Price to Audience ft. @ObjeqtEcomm, @taliagw, @CopyHackers

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

Pricing has so many roles to play in e-commerce. It has to cover product costs, personnel costs, and marketing costs to keep the business running (and profitable!), and it can act as a marketing tool, differentiating you from higher priced competitors. It’s a fine line to walk if you try to do it all – and most companies think they have to do it all.

But when it comes to conversion rate optimization (CRO), the lowest possible price isn’t always the right price – in fact price doesn’t necessarily depend on what the other guys are doing. The price you can charge for optimal conversions is based on a whole other criterion: Your audience.

Playing The Price is Right

Let’s play a game: True or False

If you lower your prices, your conversions will improve.

Well?

False – it depends on your audience and your unique value proposition (why they’re buying from you, rather than anyone else).

It’s counter-intuitive, but people don’t buy based on lowest price. They buy based on:

  • Trust
  • Brand (which is tied to trust)
  • Ease of purchasing
  • How well you communicate your value proposition
  • Proof your product will deliver the buyer’s desired outcome (also tied to trust)
  • Reduction or removal of risk (read: Trust)
  • Immediate action incentives

Basically, your sale depends on building trust, delivering desired outcomes, and tipping the scales of decision by gently prodding your buyer to act. When you have that combo in place, you’re no longer a price-based decision, you’re a value-based decision.

But – if your value proposition is, in fact, that you guarantee the cheapest price around, and that’s working well for you, then you’re already appealing to your target audience of bargain hunters. You don’t necessarily need to attract those who seek value to run a profitable business. Just look at Wal-Mart. You do still have to understand your audience and gain their trust though, because cheap prices won’t overcome those deficiencies. So read on.

Read More on Objeqt


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

E-Commerce

Defining Your Ideal Customer in e-Commerce ft. @ObjeqtEcomm, @Shanelle_Mullin, @bellastone

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

There is a lot of information on defining your ideal customer, but most of it isn’t written for you. It’s written for software-as-a-service companies, or startups, or both. And while e-commerce can benefit from many of the same best-practices, some of the information written in those articles just doesn’t apply.

This article is written just for you, and it’s all about how to define, find, and attract your ideal e-commerce customer.

First, my definition of an ideal customer:

An ideal customer is someone who has a problem you are uniquely equipped to solve, who is willing, able and happy to pay for that solution, and who is delighted to have found you.

And they shouldn’t drive you nuts (nobody says this, but it’s important – ideal customers are not the ones who take up all of your customer service agents’ time, return more products than they buy, and complain about you on social media). Nobody needs that.

This is why I included the “delighted” clause; people who are delighted to find you genuinely appreciate what you have to offer. They’ll be more inclined to become loyal customers, make repeat purchases, and recommend you to their friends, which are vital elements to any growth strategy.

How do you find these ideal clients?

Read More on Objeqt


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

Customer Success, Product Management, SaaS

Product Managers: Why You Should Include Customer Success Milestones In Your User Flows ft. @Wootric & @16v

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

As a Product Manager, you develop user flows to chart how customers move from signup to successfully using your SaaS product. Your colleagues in Customer Success are doing the same thing — mapping a flow of customer milestones to success.

But “success” can mean different things to PMs and CSMs. And, while both teams employ user flows (or customer journeys), what they put on them are very different, reflecting their very different goals.

You are responsible for making the product functionally work, with enough awesome UX so it’s relatively intuitive for the customer to use. For your team, “success” often means that the product works. It does what it says it will do, and does it well.

Customer Success is responsible for helping customers use the product to achieve their desired outcome. Most of the time, that desired outcome isn’t in the product – it’s outside of it. For example, if I purchase a budgeting app, my desired outcome is to save enough money to sun myself on a Caribbean beach, with a good-looking server to bring me fruity drinks with umbrellas in them. The Customer Success manager’s job is to get me there.

You might say it’s a conflict between focusing on the world inside the product and the wide, wide world outside of it.

And that conflict can bring about a deep divide between Product and Customer Success.

Yet, we’re all working towards the same goal: Creating a product people love, need and want more of.

What if you were to bring both user flows together, so the functionality inside the product meets the desired outcomes outside of the product?

Read More on Wootric


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.

Metrics

Why we focus on the Little Data ft. @UseNotion

Image created by Yasmine Sedky (@yazsedky).

Modern technology is a wonder, isn’t it? Once you learn what tracking metrics can do for your business – customer metrics, internal team metrics – you want to apply tracking to anything and everything, simply because you can. The promise of Big Data tells us that if we can just crunch more numbers or analyze bigger data sets, we’ll somehow discover new pearls of wisdom, breakthrough aha moments, and the secret to that coveted unicorn status.

So when you’re crafting your strategy of determining what to track, should you just track it all?

Yes and no.

Yes, you should track all of the metrics that matter to your team and to your company.

And no, you shouldn’t track them all at the same time.

We refer to those team metrics that matter most at any given point as your Little Data. And focusing on the little data is what drives success.

Technology allows you to theoretically track ALL THE THINGS, but human capacity requires prioritization. People and teams perform better when they’re focused, so we recommend starting small, centering your attention on the Little Data that matters most to your team, and evolving that focus as your strategy and tactics evolve.

Read More on Notion


Let’s Get SaaSsy – I’m offering a limited number of SaaS consulting engagements.